Anonymous: Observe again: "Somebody left their umbrella in the office. Would they please collect it" "A journalist should not be forced to reveal their sources." "They" and "their" are singular pronouns, I rest my case. Only using "he" and "she" completely erases those who do not identify as either. Luckily, "they" and "their" are singular, as well as plural. English language bro.

I know that it works sometimes but the point of the post before was that adding a “(s)” before he in sentences is never necessary because them/they/their can always replace them. This isn’t so, albeit it probably works a lot of the time, but not all the time and that’s the point.

strawberry-delicious:

weshleey:

itsvondell:

corporal-levi-achoo:

itsvondell:

you sure

them went to the bathroom sounds stupid as shit

they

That only works in a single sentence. Using a pronoun subsequently to referring to a person in a previous sentence, you can’t use they/them. For instance:
Sam boarded the bus eager to start his next chapter of life at Rydell high School. Despite what others had told they, them was optimistic for what adventures lied ahead. Once Sam got to school he went looking for they’s first class, cluelessly wandering the halls the only thing helping they was the fact they wasn’t alone in this endeavor that we all go through: high school. 

Sam boarded the bus eager to start their next chapter of life at Rydell high School. Despite what others had told them, they were optimistic for what adventures lied ahead. Once Sam got to school they went looking for their first class, cluelessly wandering the halls the only thing helping them was the fact they weren’t alone in this endeavor that we all go through: high school. 
Christ, it’s not that hard.

You can’t just substitute they, them, and them for he, him, and his / she and her. Those have two different meanings, the former is used to describe multiple things/people. If I said “They ran yesterday” you’d think a group of people ran yesterday; if I said “(S)he ran yesterday” you’d think just a single person ran yesterday.  
strawberry-delicious:

weshleey:

itsvondell:

corporal-levi-achoo:

itsvondell:

you sure

them went to the bathroom sounds stupid as shit

they

That only works in a single sentence. Using a pronoun subsequently to referring to a person in a previous sentence, you can’t use they/them. For instance:
Sam boarded the bus eager to start his next chapter of life at Rydell high School. Despite what others had told they, them was optimistic for what adventures lied ahead. Once Sam got to school he went looking for they’s first class, cluelessly wandering the halls the only thing helping they was the fact they wasn’t alone in this endeavor that we all go through: high school. 

Sam boarded the bus eager to start their next chapter of life at Rydell high School. Despite what others had told them, they were optimistic for what adventures lied ahead. Once Sam got to school they went looking for their first class, cluelessly wandering the halls the only thing helping them was the fact they weren’t alone in this endeavor that we all go through: high school. 
Christ, it’s not that hard.

You can’t just substitute they, them, and them for he, him, and his / she and her. Those have two different meanings, the former is used to describe multiple things/people. If I said “They ran yesterday” you’d think a group of people ran yesterday; if I said “(S)he ran yesterday” you’d think just a single person ran yesterday.  
strawberry-delicious:

weshleey:

itsvondell:

corporal-levi-achoo:

itsvondell:

you sure

them went to the bathroom sounds stupid as shit

they

That only works in a single sentence. Using a pronoun subsequently to referring to a person in a previous sentence, you can’t use they/them. For instance:
Sam boarded the bus eager to start his next chapter of life at Rydell high School. Despite what others had told they, them was optimistic for what adventures lied ahead. Once Sam got to school he went looking for they’s first class, cluelessly wandering the halls the only thing helping they was the fact they wasn’t alone in this endeavor that we all go through: high school. 

Sam boarded the bus eager to start their next chapter of life at Rydell high School. Despite what others had told them, they were optimistic for what adventures lied ahead. Once Sam got to school they went looking for their first class, cluelessly wandering the halls the only thing helping them was the fact they weren’t alone in this endeavor that we all go through: high school. 
Christ, it’s not that hard.

You can’t just substitute they, them, and them for he, him, and his / she and her. Those have two different meanings, the former is used to describe multiple things/people. If I said “They ran yesterday” you’d think a group of people ran yesterday; if I said “(S)he ran yesterday” you’d think just a single person ran yesterday.  
strawberry-delicious:

weshleey:

itsvondell:

corporal-levi-achoo:

itsvondell:

you sure

them went to the bathroom sounds stupid as shit

they

That only works in a single sentence. Using a pronoun subsequently to referring to a person in a previous sentence, you can’t use they/them. For instance:
Sam boarded the bus eager to start his next chapter of life at Rydell high School. Despite what others had told they, them was optimistic for what adventures lied ahead. Once Sam got to school he went looking for they’s first class, cluelessly wandering the halls the only thing helping they was the fact they wasn’t alone in this endeavor that we all go through: high school. 

Sam boarded the bus eager to start their next chapter of life at Rydell high School. Despite what others had told them, they were optimistic for what adventures lied ahead. Once Sam got to school they went looking for their first class, cluelessly wandering the halls the only thing helping them was the fact they weren’t alone in this endeavor that we all go through: high school. 
Christ, it’s not that hard.

You can’t just substitute they, them, and them for he, him, and his / she and her. Those have two different meanings, the former is used to describe multiple things/people. If I said “They ran yesterday” you’d think a group of people ran yesterday; if I said “(S)he ran yesterday” you’d think just a single person ran yesterday.  

strawberry-delicious:

weshleey:

itsvondell:

corporal-levi-achoo:

itsvondell:

you sure

them went to the bathroom sounds stupid as shit

they

That only works in a single sentence. Using a pronoun subsequently to referring to a person in a previous sentence, you can’t use they/them. For instance:

Sam boarded the bus eager to start his next chapter of life at Rydell high School. Despite what others had told they, them was optimistic for what adventures lied ahead. Once Sam got to school he went looking for they’s first class, cluelessly wandering the halls the only thing helping they was the fact they wasn’t alone in this endeavor that we all go through: high school. 

Sam boarded the bus eager to start their next chapter of life at Rydell high School. Despite what others had told them, they were optimistic for what adventures lied ahead. Once Sam got to school they went looking for their first class, cluelessly wandering the halls the only thing helping them was the fact they weren’t alone in this endeavor that we all go through: high school. 

Christ, it’s not that hard.

You can’t just substitute they, them, and them for he, him, and his / she and her. Those have two different meanings, the former is used to describe multiple things/people. If I said “They ran yesterday” you’d think a group of people ran yesterday; if I said “(S)he ran yesterday” you’d think just a single person ran yesterday.  

Anonymous: Observe: Sam boarded the bus eager to start his next chapter of life at Rydell high School. Despite what others had told them, they were optimistic for what adventures lied ahead. Once Sam got to school he went looking for their first class, cluelessly wandering the halls the only thing helping them was the fact they weren't alone in this endeavor that we all go through: high school. By changing "was" to "were" and "wasn't" to "weren't" your left with a perfectly legible sentence.

Yes the sentence is legible but it changes the perspective, also in the beginning of the third sentence you use “he” and because of the earlier posts we are trying to avoid using he or she. 

My first point about perspective though, the phrase “they were optimistic” and “(S)he was optmistic” are two different phrases. The first implies multiple people were optimistic while the latter states that a single person, in this case that would be Sam, was optimistic. That’s two different things. 

I’m not saying I think we need to change all of my gender pronouns and rethink how I write but the poster before me said something incorrect and I’m going to call him or her on it. 

In conclusion you can not always replace he/she him/her without changing the meaning of the senentce, and you shouldn’t need to anyway.

itsvondell:

corporal-levi-achoo:

itsvondell:

you sure

them went to the bathroom sounds stupid as shit

they

That only works in a single sentence. Using a pronoun subsequently to referring to a person in a previous sentence, you can’t use they/them. For instance:

Sam boarded the bus eager to start his next chapter of life at Rydell high School. Despite what others had told they, them was optimistic for what adventures lied ahead. Once Sam got to school he went looking for they’s first class, cluelessly wandering the halls the only thing helping they was the fact they wasn’t alone in this endeavor that we all go through: high school. 
itsvondell:

corporal-levi-achoo:

itsvondell:

you sure

them went to the bathroom sounds stupid as shit

they

That only works in a single sentence. Using a pronoun subsequently to referring to a person in a previous sentence, you can’t use they/them. For instance:

Sam boarded the bus eager to start his next chapter of life at Rydell high School. Despite what others had told they, them was optimistic for what adventures lied ahead. Once Sam got to school he went looking for they’s first class, cluelessly wandering the halls the only thing helping they was the fact they wasn’t alone in this endeavor that we all go through: high school. 
itsvondell:

corporal-levi-achoo:

itsvondell:

you sure

them went to the bathroom sounds stupid as shit

they

That only works in a single sentence. Using a pronoun subsequently to referring to a person in a previous sentence, you can’t use they/them. For instance:

Sam boarded the bus eager to start his next chapter of life at Rydell high School. Despite what others had told they, them was optimistic for what adventures lied ahead. Once Sam got to school he went looking for they’s first class, cluelessly wandering the halls the only thing helping they was the fact they wasn’t alone in this endeavor that we all go through: high school. 
itsvondell:

corporal-levi-achoo:

itsvondell:

you sure

them went to the bathroom sounds stupid as shit

they

That only works in a single sentence. Using a pronoun subsequently to referring to a person in a previous sentence, you can’t use they/them. For instance:

Sam boarded the bus eager to start his next chapter of life at Rydell high School. Despite what others had told they, them was optimistic for what adventures lied ahead. Once Sam got to school he went looking for they’s first class, cluelessly wandering the halls the only thing helping they was the fact they wasn’t alone in this endeavor that we all go through: high school. 

itsvondell:

corporal-levi-achoo:

itsvondell:

you sure

them went to the bathroom sounds stupid as shit

they

That only works in a single sentence. Using a pronoun subsequently to referring to a person in a previous sentence, you can’t use they/them. For instance:

Sam boarded the bus eager to start his next chapter of life at Rydell high School. Despite what others had told they, them was optimistic for what adventures lied ahead. Once Sam got to school he went looking for they’s first class, cluelessly wandering the halls the only thing helping they was the fact they wasn’t alone in this endeavor that we all go through: high school. 

(via strawberry-delicious)

thatkidonthestage:

wanting to listen to a soundtrack to a musical you haven’t seen but not knowing the storyline so you go on wikipedia and read the synopsis as you listen to the songs

A Gentlemen’s Guide to Love and Murder